Completed Projects & Updates

Jon Ross on Mar 29th 2017

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BENEFICIARY: Syama family (3 in the immediate family)

syma-family

LOCATION: Bhaktapur, Nepal

PROJECT: Home repair/earthquake retrofit

PROJECT DATE: Winter 2017

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Home damaged/unlivable Gorkha earthquake 2015

syma-back-ext-2

the back of the Syama family  home after the quake—propped up with 2 x 4s and completely unsafe

syma-door-frame-1

MicroAid removed the wall and began a complete rebuild of the five-story structure, even removing the top floor for safety

 

syma crew working

the crew working hard to finish before the next rainy season

 

taking down the upper floor windows

taking down the upper wall and  windows

 

new wall and windows for the syama family

new wall and windows for the Syama family

 

new rooftop

new  safe rooftop

new back try for the syama family

new back door for the Syama family’s  new home

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BENEFICIARY: Balram family (16 in the immediate family, dozens in the extended family)

balram family fest dress

LOCATION: Bhaktapur, Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

PROJECT: One New Home Construction

PROJECT DATE: Spring/Summer 2016

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Home destroyed by Gorkha Earthquake April 2105

 

Balram family quonset hut

Makeshift shelter for the family since the quake, before MicroAid

katunje site skyview1

New house under construction—building to the highest seismic standards.

katunje site low1

New house under construction—building to the highest seismic standards.

katunje site konstans view w glass (1)

New home for the family—will last for generations to come.

katunje site outhouse old (1)

Old bathroom/outhouse.

katune site bathroom w toilet (1)

Now they have indoor plumbing.

Balram family quonset interior

Old interior was dark and cramped and leaky—cold in the winter, hot in the summer.

katunje site front door int (1)

New home is airy and secure and light and weather-tight.

katunje site light fixture w doors int (1)

With electric lights.

katunje site front door w santosh (1)

Home sweet home for the Balram family thanks to MicroAid.

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BENEFICIARY: Betty family (14 in the immediate family, dozens in the extended family)

betty family final

LOCATION: Omawas, Eastern Samar, Philippines

PROJECT: One New Home Construction and One Total Home Repair

PROJECT DATE: May 2015

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Homes destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan 2013

 

1 betty site starting

betty’s compound before microaid

3 betty site with moneth framing

one house being repaired, one house being built

6 betty site partial new roof 1

9 betty site roof framing partial w workers

new roof for old house, too

betty site final final

betty’s MicroAid houses complete.

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BENEFICIARY: Pedro family (12 in the immediate family, dozens in the extended family)

jon and pedro family final med

LOCATION: Maybocog, Eastern Samar, Philippines

PROJECT: Two New Home Constructions

PROJECT DATE: May 2015

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Homes destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan 2013

 

a pedro old house

1 pedro starting 1

pedro’s site one house started

2 pedro with framing

pedro’s site – second house going up

5 pedro site w roofs framing 3

6 pedro side with windows

pedro’s houses with windows

pedro site final

pedro’s MicroAid houses complete

 

 

 

 

 

 

BENEFICIARY: Ah Lett Chaung Village Clinic (serving 75 patients per week)

LOCATION: Ah Lett Chaung Village (one hour from Yangon, Ayeyarwaddy Division, Myanmar)

PROJECT:  Supply water purification/filtration solution for the village clinic.

PROJECT DATE: November, 2014

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Water source for the village compromised by Cyclone Nargis, 2008.

In April of 2008, the most powerful cyclone on record, plowed into the delta region of Myanmar (Burma), killing 300,000 and displacing almost a million people. The accompanying storm-surge destroyed rice paddies, wells, and reservoirs.

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The low-lying village of Ah Lett Chaung, across the river from Yangon, had been without a source of clean drinking water since the storm.

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Even the clinic was without a source of purified water.

MicroAid provided the clinic with water purification/filtration systems.

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The filters will also be introduced at the household level and, if accepted, we will distribute more to the individual families.

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BENEFICIARY: Ormachea-Hermoza family (12 in the immediate family, dozens in the extended family)

LOCATION: Paca Vilcanota, Urubamba, Sacred Valley, Peru

PROJECT: New Home Construction

PROJECT DATE: May-Aug, 2013

ORIGINAL DISASTER:  Adobe home destroyed by floods in 2010

In January of 2010, the Urubamba river in the Sacred Valley of Peru became a raging torrent destroying more than 25,000 homes.

In the poor community of Paca Vilcanota in Urubamaba, the Ormachea-Hermoza family lost their home and possessions that took them a lifetime to accumulate.  In 2012, MicroAid met the family, did a baseline study and committed to replacing their home.

cleared site (the wall in the back is not part of our house)

Over the course of four months in 2013, we built a 1,400-square-foot concrete-block home, with a full second floor foundation.

reinforced concrete foundation and columns

supports for the second floor foundation

channels for potential second floor

basic structure in place

1,600 concrete blocks were used in the construction

finished with concrete stucco

custom doos and windows

Twelve people will live in the five-room house, and dozens of other family members will benefit from it.

This MicroAid  project also employed dozens of workers and injected much needed cash into the local economy.

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BENEFICIARY: Matafa’a Village (pop. 25 families, about 300 people)

LOCATION:  Southwest coast, Upolu, Samoa

PROJECT:  Replace/build 16 canoes

PROJECT DATE:  April, 2012

ORIGINAL DISASTER:  Canoes destroyed/washed away, September 2009 tsunami

In September of 2009, a tsunami slammed into the south coast of the main island of the independent country of Samoa.  Many people lost their lives and many others had all their possessions swept away.  In Matafa’a, one of the most remote villages in Samoa, all their canoes were destroyed or washed away.  For Matafa’a this was particularly devastating because they rely solely on canoes to get across the bay to connect with the rest of the island—it’s the way the kids get to school, the adults to the shop and to the bus stop to get to jobs in the capital of Apia.

MicroAid worked with the local craftsmen to build 16 canoes so that every family in the village would have one.  Additionally, because we were making so many canoes in so short a time, the older men were able to teach the next generation the skills necessary to carve a canoe.  And since the project was completed, other villages have hired the men to make canoes for them—an unexpected benefit of the project.

Here’s the basic process of building one canoe.  (We did 16.)

Find a suitably big tree in the jungle and cut it down.

Do the basic shaping and carving in the jungle.

The hull.

Digout and drag out of the jungle.

Finishing work.

Finished work of art.

Connect outriggers.

Paint.

Launch.

Matafa’a MicroAid fleet.

Crowded school bus before project.

Safe and sound thanks to MicroAid.

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BENEFICIARY: Salea’a’umua Village (pop. 50 families, about 600 people)

LOCATION:  Southeast coast, Upolu, Samoa

PROJECT:  Replace Fishing Kits

PROJECT DATE:  March, 2012

ORIGINAL DISASTER:  Fishing kits washed away, September 2009 tsunami

When we think of fishing we usually imagine someone casting a line into the water and reeling in their catch.  In Samoa, fishing means swimming under the surface at night and using a spear (in other parts of the world called a “Hawaiian Sling”) to snag your prey, and/or stringing a net across part of the lagoon.

Here, a “fishing kit” is comprised of a mask, snorkel, fins, an underwater light, a spear, 180 meters of fishing net, and a cooler.

The 2009 tsunami washed away the people’s possessions, including their fishing kits—and most have not been replaced.  Now, if a villager wants dinner, they probably have to buy a fish at the market.  And since the villagers don’t really have any cash of their own, they usually end up borrowing money to pay for things—which starts a vicious cycle.

Things in Samoa are very expensive—about two-and-a-half times what they cost in the U.S.—so the likelihood that anyone could put together their own kit is remote.

To help people return to self-sufficiency, MicroAid has donated five fishing kits to the village of Salea’a’umua on the southeast coast of Upolu—the hardest hit area of the 2009 tsunami.

The women’s committee of the village will be in charge of loaning out the kits on a nightly basis, maintaining them, and monitoring their use.  Villagers can even sell extra fish if they catch enough.

This MicroAid project helps people reclaim their independence.

MicroAid receives a lavalava from villagers

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BENEFICIARY: Soodin Family

soodin-family-w-roy

LOCATION: Hambantota, Sri Lanka

PROJECT: New Home Construction

PROJECT DATE: April, 2010

ORIGINAL DISASTER: House destroyed, December 2004 tsunami

In Hambantota, a town in southern Sri Lanka which was very hard hit by the tsunami in 2004—fifty thousand were killed, with hundreds of thousands displaced, and thousands of orphans created—MicroAid built a house for the Soodin family. They were very poor to begin with and over the years, many an INGO had promised to help, but never came through. Mr. Soodin is an industrious brick maker, but is living hand-to-mouth as he supports his wife, three sons, and three daughters. All the kids are going to school, except for one of the sons who works at the salt factory.

As a humanitarian project, the measure of this one will not be in how we helped “build capacity” or “affected productivity,” it will be in how many nights this family lives under a real roof, surrounded by solid walls, with a modicum of privacy, rather than living in a cramped, corrugated-tin shanty!

Soodin abode since 2004

Soodin abode since 2004

new Soodin house under construction

new Soodin house under construction

4-10-soodin-front-w-frames-cu

new home for the Soodins

old kitchen

old Soodin kitchen

new Soodin kitchen

new Soodin kitchen

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BENEFICIARY: Thaya Family

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LOCATION: Kallady, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka

PROJECT: House Completion/Security, 3 Doors & 2 Windows

PROJECT DATE: March, 2010

ORIGINAL DISASTER: House destroyed, December, 2004 tsunami

MicroAid provided windows and doors to two tsunami families who, after their homes were washed away, were just handed money to rebuild. Well, needless to say, most of these simple people did not know how to budget for construction and were targeted by unscrupulous “contractors,” so most were left with half-completed and inadequate homes. The international agencies that gave them the cash (and you would recognize the big names) never did any follow-up to see how the money was spent, or if the people were OK. Until MicroAid showed up last year, no one had checked in on them.

Mrs. Thaya has three sons and tries to make ends meet by running a “boutique.”  When I asked where it was, she pointed to the hut in the corner of the compound.  The place does a brisk business with locals stopping by to pick up odd and ends.  Mrs. Thaya also supports her husband who was disabled in an accident when he was working at a bakery.  He lost an eye and was dismissed because he could no longer do his job.  There is no workman’s comp here.

thaya house since 2005

Thaya house since 2005

Window frames are custom made by the mill and fitted by a mason

window & door frames are custom made by the mill

window frames are installed by a mason

frames are installed by a mason

windows & doors installed by a carpenter

windows & doors hung by a carpenter

doors are hand carved

doors are hand carved

Thaya House complete

Thaya house complete and secure

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BENEFICIARY: Nagakanni Family

nagakanni-front-w-family4

LOCATION: Kallady, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka

PROJECT: House Completion/Security, 2 Doors & 4 Windows

PROJECT DATE: March, 2010

ORIGINAL DISASTER: House destroyed, December, 2004 Tsunami

Mrs. Nagakanni’s husband, a fisherman, had been abducted by the LTTE and then imprisoned for seven years.  He was away when the tsunami struck and destroyed their home.  They have a son and four daughters.  Their uncompleted house was designed with expensive, fancy arched openings for the front doors and window—a ridiculous design element given the circumstances and budget.  There are no standard sizes here; each opening is a different dimension.  Consequently, every frame, window, and door has to be custom made by a mill, then installed by a mason, then finished by another carpenter (in addition to grillwork done by a welder), making this the most expensive part of the house.  Both families helped by providing their own labor, and meals for the workers.  MicroAid  provided them with the dignity of a house with some security, privacy, light and ventilation.  They now have a home and not a dark depressing cave!

Nagakanni House since 2005

Nagakanni house since 2005

Nagakanni house complete and secure

Nagakanni house complete and secure

Nagakanni side of house

old Nagakanni side of house

fitting window frames

fitting window frames

new windows

new windows

Nagakanni interior corner

old Nagakanni interior corner

new Nagakanni windows and door

new windows and door

Happy home, happy kids

happy home, happy kids

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BENEFICIARY: Piumi Iniwinna

u5

LOCATION: Siribopura, Hambantota, Sri Lanka

PROJECT: 3 year educational scholarship

PROJECT DATE: March 2010, ongoing for 3 years

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Mother killed, father paralyzed, December, 2004 tsunami

MicroAid will be supporting the education of this tsunami orphan for three years of primary school—otherwise it would have been a major struggle for her to attend. We will supply workbooks, transportation, lunch, additional tutoring, some doctoring (if needed), and shoes. Her father was paralyzed and her mother was killed at the Sunday market near the harbor, which was jammed packed the morning of the tsunami. She was taken in by her aunt, and wants to be a teacher when she grows up. She is 8 years old in the 3rd grade. Through our local partner, The Woman’s Development Federation, which runs the wonderful scholarship program, we will keep track of Piumi as she pursues an education and a brighter future. After three years, we can evaluate whether to support her academic efforts for another three.

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BENEFICIARY: Anukala Shashibani

hambantota-orphan-anukala

LOCATION: Maurapura, Hambantota, Sri Lanka

PROJECT: 3 year educational scholarship

PROJECT DATE: March 2010, ongoing for 3 years

ORIGINAL DISASTER: Parents killed, December, 2004 tsunami

MicroAid will be supporting the education of this tsunami orphan for three years of primary school—otherwise it would have been a major struggle for her to attend. We will supply workbooks, transportation, lunch, additional tutoring, some doctoring (if needed), and shoes. Both her parents were killed at the Sunday market near the harbor, which was jammed packed the morning of the tsunami. She was taken in by her grandmother, and like Piumi, wants to be a teacher when she grows up. She loves to dance and is very talented.  She is 10 years old in the 5th grade. Through our local partner, The Woman’s Development Federation, which runs the wonderful scholarship program, we will keep track of Anukala as she pursues an education and a brighter future. After three years, we can evaluate whether to support her academic efforts for another three.

the money in the account can only be used for specific educational needs

the money in the account can only be used for specific educational needs

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